it means the sea life

patagonia:

Post-lunch and ready to explore an outlet glacier of Vatnajökull, Iceland.
Submitted by Molly Tankersley, of Scenic Route Travels

Dream!
Sep 12, 2014 / 1,076 notes

patagonia:

Post-lunch and ready to explore an outlet glacier of Vatnajökull, Iceland.

Submitted by Molly Tankersley, of Scenic Route Travels

Dream!

Suede everythang at fashion week and she’s already wearing suede. 
Sep 12, 2014 / 452 notes

Suede everythang at fashion week and she’s already wearing suede. 

(via thatkindofwoman)

Sep 12, 2014 / 713,247 notes

edsheerun:

i just want a boy to like me

no not that one

(via theredhouse)

Sep 12, 2014

In fact a mature person does not fall in love, he rises in love. The word ’fall’ is not right. Only immature people fall; they stumble and fall down in love. Somehow they were managing and standing. They cannot manage and they cannot stand – they find a woman and they are gone, they find a man and they are gone. They were always ready to fall on the ground and to creep. They don’t have the backbone, the spine; they don’t have that integrity to stand alone.
A mature person has the integrity to be alone. And when a mature person gives love, he gives without any strings attached to it: he simply gives. And when a mature person gives love, he feels grateful that you have accepted his love, not vice versa. He does not expect you to be thankful for it – no, not at all, he does not even need your thanks. He thanks you for accepting his love. And when two mature persons are in love, one of the greatest paradoxes of life happens, one of the most beautiful phenomena: they are together and yet tremendously alone; they are together so much so that they are almost one. But their oneness does not destroy their individuality, in fact, it enhances it: they become more individual.


Two mature persons in love help each other to become more free. There is no politics involved, no diplomacy, no effort to dominate. How can you dominate the person you love? Just think over it. Domination is a sort of hatred, anger, enmity. How can you think of dominating a person you love? You would love to see the person totally free, independent; you will give him more individuality. That’s why I call it the greatest paradox: they are together so much so that they are almost one, but still in that oneness they are individuals. Their individualities are not effaced – they have become more enhanced. The other has enriched them as far as their freedom is concerned.


Immature people falling in love destroy each other’s freedom, create a bondage, make a prison. Mature persons in love help each other to be free; they help each other to destroy all sorts of bondages. And when love flows with freedom there is beauty. When love flows with dependence there is ugliness.

Sep 12, 2014 / 8,821 notes
Sep 12, 2014 / 987 notes
lagunabay:

lagunabay /// twitter / music
Sep 11, 2014 / 220 notes
We spend a lot of time judging women for the choices that they make, or even the choices thrust upon them. We nod when victims of domestic violence apologize for “the role” they played in their assaults. We want celebrities whose private, revealing photographs have been stolen and distributed to be sorry for having taken private photographs in the first place. We expect rape victims to be sorry for being raped—this is the crux of Sarah Silverman’s whole “rape jokes” bit. Women who get catcalled should have walked somewhere else, women who attract unwanted attention should be sorry for being so attractive, and on and on and on. Women say sorry when there is literally nothing to be sorry about. And some of that, as has been discussed, is a survival mechanism in a culture that punishes those who dare to not be sorry for any of the above. Women who do what they have to do to get by shouldn’t be sorry about it, even if what they have to do is say sorry all the time.

But what if we weren’t sorry, not for any of it? What if it were fine to be not sorry?
Sep 11, 2014 / 133 notes
Sep 11, 2014 / 206 notes

megsokay:

decider:

In honor of New York Fashion week, see how Patricia Field’s looks for ‘Sex and the City,’ ‘Ugly Betty,’ and ‘The Devil Wears Prada’ influenced New York City fashion. http://dcdr.me/1tC3Ig5

I spent a lot of time looking at pretty clothes this week.

Last photo though… the definition of fierce. 

Sep 10, 2014 / 29,805 notes

blackhistoryalbum:

Eartha Kitt | 1960s

Quote, “I wouldn’t bother to describe me. I’m Eartha Kitt.”

(via omgstopembarrassingyourself)